Table of Contents

The book will be in published soon. The current Table of Contents is:

1 Introduction

2 Web Science
2.1 Motivation
2.2 Technical solution
2.2.1 History of the Web
2.2.2 Building the Web
2.2.3 Web in Society
2.2.4 Operationalizing the Web Science for a World of International Commerce
2.2.5 Analyzing the Web
2.3 Web 2.0
2.4 Conclusions

3 Service Science
3.1 Motivation
3.2 What Is a Service?
3.2.1 Service Science and IT
3.3 Service Analysis, Design, Development and Test
3.4 Service Orchestration, Composition and Delivery
3.5 Service Innovation
3.6 Service Design Approach
3.7 Service pricing method and economics
3.8 Service quality measurement
3.9 Service Technologies
3.10 Service Application
3.11 Conclusions

4 Web Services
4.1 Motivation
4.1.1 Service Oriented Computing (SOC)
4.1.2 Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)
4.2 Technical solution
4.2.1 Defining Web services
4.2.2 Web Service technologies
4.3 Illustration by a Larger Example
4.4 Summary
4.5 Exercises

5 Web2.0 and RESTful services
5.1 Motivation
5.2 Technical solution
5.2.1 REST
5.2.2 Describing RESTful services
5.2.3 Data exchange for RESTful services
5.2.4 AJAX APIs
5.2.5 Examples of RESTful services
5.3 Illustration by a larger example
5.4 Summary
5.5 Exercises

6 Web Service Modeling Ontology
6.1 Motivation
6.2 Technical solution
6.2.1 Ontologies
6.2.2 Web services
6.2.3 Goals
6.2.4 Mediators
6.3 Extensions
6.4 Illustration by a larger example
6.4.1 Ontologies
6.4.2 Goals
6.4.3 Web services
6.4.4 Mediators
6.5 Summary
6.6 Exercises

7 The Web Service Modeling Language
7.1 Motivation
7.1.1 Principles of WSMO
7.1.2 Logics families and Semantic Web Services
7.2 Technical solution
7.2.1 WSML Language Variants
7.2.2 WSML Basis
7.2.3 Ontologies in WSML
7.2.4 Web services in WSML
7.2.5 Goals in WSML
7.2.6 Mediators in WSML
7.2.7 Technologies for Using WSML
7.3 Extensions
7.4 Illustration by a larger example
7.4.1 Travel ontology
7.4.2 Services
7.4.3 Goal
7.5 Summary
7.6 Exercises

8 The Web Service Execution Environment
8.1 Motivation
8.1.1 Service Orientation
8.1.2 Execution Environment for Semantic Web Services
8.1.3 Governing Principles
8.2 Technical solution
8.2.1 SESA Vision
8.2.2 SESA Middleware
8.2.3 SESA Execution Semantics
8.3 Illustration by a larger example
8.3.1 Modeling of Business Services
8.3.2 Execution of Services
8.4 Possible Extensions
8.4.1 Goal Subscription
8.5 Summary
8.6 Exercises

9 OWL-S and other approaches
9.1 Motivation
9.2 OWL-S
9.2.1 Service Profile
9.2.2 Service Grounding
9.2.3 Service Model
9.2.5 Tool Support
9.2.6 OWL-S Summary
9.3 METEOR-S
9.3.1 Semantic annotation of Web services
9.3.2 Semantics-based discovery of Web Services
9.3.3 Composition of Web Services
9.3.4 METEOR-S Summary
9.4 IRS-III
9.4.1 Discovery, Selection and Mediation
9.4.2 Communication
9.4.3 Choreography and Orchestration
9.5 Summary
9.6 Exercises

10 Triple Space Computing for SemanticWeb Services
10.1 Motivation
10.2 Technical solution
10.2.1 Tuplespace computing
10.2.2 Triple Space computing
10.2.3 Triple Space conceptual models
10.2.4 Triple Space architecture
10.2.5 Triple Space and Semantic Web services
10.2.6 Triple Space and Semantic SOA
10.3 Illustration by a larger example

11 Lightweight SemanticWeb Service Descriptions
11.1 Motivation
11.2 Technical solution
11.2.1 SAWSDL
11.2.2 WSMO-Lite Service Semantics
11.2.3 WSMO-Lite in SAWSDL
11.2.4 WSMO-Lite for RESTful Services
11.3 Extensions
11.4 Summary
11.5 Exercises

12 SWS are good for what: dip, SUPER, and SOA4All use cases
12.1 Motivation
12.2 Data, Information, and Process Integration with Semantic Web Services (DIP)
12.2.1 Motivation
12.2.2 Technical solution
12.2.3 Use Cases
12.3 Semantics Utilized for Process management within and between Enterprises (SUPER)
12.3.1 Motivation
12.3.2 Technical solution
12.3.3 Use cases
12.4 Service Oriented Architectures for All (SOA4All)
12.4.1 Motivation
12.4.2 Technical solution
12.4.3 Use Cases
12.5 Summary

13 Seekda: The Business Point of View
13.1 Motivation
13.2 Technical solution
13.2.1 Crawler
13.2.2 Search Engine
13.2.3 Bundle Configurator and Assistant
13.3 Illustration by a larger example
13.4 Summary
13.5 Exercises

14 Summary

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